Heartworm disease is REAL!

Your veterinarian or veterinary nurse or technician is NOT trying to SELL you heartworm prevention. They are genuinely concerned and want to prevent a potentially FATAL disease because they love your pet and want it to live a long healthy life.  How heartworm is spread  Mosquitos spread heartworm disease. A mosquito bites a heartworm positive dog/fox/coyote and sucks the blood. The mosquito now bites and  infects your dog/cat/ferret. The baby heartworm burrows into the skin and starts its lifecycle in your pet.  Worms mature over 2-4 months and eventually end up in the heart and lungs. Mature worms are 10-15cm
Read More

Is Your Veterinary Hospital AAHA Accredited?

The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) is the only accrediting organization in the United State and Canada for veterinary hospitals. Only 15% of the 26,000 hospitals in the US are accredited and meet the stringent standards and guidelines set forth by AAHA. By choosing an AAHA accredited hospital, you are assured your pet is receiving the best possible care because these hospitals pay attention to the details. Its the details that are important and create the trust you look for in a veterinary hospital. AAHA routinely inspects accredited hospitals. Hospitals are expected to meet up to 900 standards in all
Read More

FDA, DCM and Grain-free Diets

The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) launched a study one year ago investigating dogs diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) that were considered atypical breeds (different than the breeds listed.) Certain breeds of dogs, such as Great Danes, Dobermans, Portuguese Water Dogs, Irish Wolfhounds, Standard/Giant Schnauzers and Newfoundlands have been found to have a genetic predisposition to the disease. Recently the FDA reported its findings of what they know to date. What we know There are an estimated 77 million dogs in the United States. DCM has been reported in dogs and cats years prior to this report. Common causes are genetic,
Read More

Responsible Pet Ownership

Pet ownership comes with many responsibilities, the biggest being financial. Pets cost money, and not just to buy them, but to care for them. Cost of a Pet Be sure to do your homework before you purchase the pet you are longing to have–sometimes the long term costs and commitments are not always expected. For example, a Blue and Gold Macaw costs approximately $3500 to purchase. The cage is $2500, food is $100 per month, initial veterinary costs are $500 for laboratory tests to confirm health and sex. Ongoing veterinary costs are approximately $500-$1000 per year depending on the health
Read More

Should I use CBD oil for my pet?

At this time…no you should not. CBD or cannabidiol was found to be highly effective for a seizure disorder in children called Dravet syndrome. This led to the production of Epidiolex, the only FDA approved and tested CBD oil. What is CBD oil? CBD oil is a concentrated extract made from cannabis flowers or leaves that is dissolved in an edible oil such as sunflower, hemp, or olive oil. Cannabis is a plant. There are different kinds of cannabis plants, one yields hemp and CBD while another kind of cannabis yields marijuana and psychoactive chemical THC (tetrahydrocannabinol.) It is believed
Read More

Nutrition: What is good gut health?

I am starting a series on nutrition and I want to begin by talking about what is good gut health. Your pet’s gut is the basis of his or her immune system. Over 70% of the immune system relates to good gut function. Why is this so important? Good gut health will help fight off infection, reduce the chance of auto-immune disease and process food effectively. There are 2 components to good gut health, 1) a healthy and diverse microbiome and 2) a leak-proof barrier system. Microbiome The gut microbiome is inside the gastrointestinal tract and houses thousands of little
Read More